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Is Digital Technology Really Good for Students?

Posted on September 23, 2015 in News Releases

The BBC reports that an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) study shows heavy use of computers and similar devices “do not improve” students’ performance in reading, mathematics, and science. The international study reported that schools with lower computer use, such as those in South Korea and China, achieved higher Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) results; indeed, Singapore reported high digital skills despite students’ moderate computer use in the classroom.

Some oppose this view. John Morris, head of Ardleigh Green junior school outside of London, England, maintains that digital technology is vital to prepare students for “jobs that don’t exist yet.” The OECD’s education director, Andreas Schleicher, says that while technology shouldn’t be completely abandoned, “digital textbooks” could replace print ones. Technology analysts Gartner estimates that globally schools spent £17.5billion on educational technology. The article does not cite North American figures.